Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Rural regions prepare for power shutoffs
As utilities begin shutting off power in an effort to prevent wildfires, California farmers, ranchers and rural residents plan for ways to manage the power loss. Some say they may invest in generators to maintain water pumps for livestock and crops, plus produce-cooling equipment and other facilities. Farmers say they understand the rationale for the shutoffs and hope they succeed, and that power interruption will be as short as possible.

Late-spring storms leave damage in their wake
Onions, tomatoes, cherries and cotton are among the crops damaged by late-spring storms in the Central Valley. Farmers, pest control advisers and agricultural commissioners say the crops suffered damage from hail or from plant diseases linked to the wet weather. Observers say the crop losses may be significant for individual farmers but not widespread enough to lead to disaster declarations in most cases.

Farm, food groups seek approval of trade agreement
Urging Congress to pass a pending trade agreement, a coalition of more than 900 farm and food organizations said the agreement would help U.S. agriculture while providing high-quality, safe food at affordable prices. In a letter to House and Senate leaders, the groups requested “swift ratification” of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. The letter’s signers included the California Farm Bureau Federation and more than three-dozen other California groups.

Nurseries track plant trends to plan greenhouse space
Tracking trends in houseplants allows Southern California nurseries to fulfill customer demand. Nursery owners say social media can help drive demand for houseplants, and note that some plants that became trendy in the 1970s are now enjoying a comeback. Keeping up with the trends requires foresight, because in some cases plants need close to a year in the greenhouse before they’re ready for sale.


ABOUT CALIFORNIA FARM BUREAU FEDERATION

The California Farm Bureau Federation works to protect family farms and ranches on behalf of nearly 36,000 members statewide and as part of a nationwide network of more than 5.5 million Farm Bureau members.