Wednesday, December 5, 2018

California Farm Bureau Annual Meeting opens
Volunteer leaders from around California gather in San Diego this week for the 100th Annual Meeting of the California Farm Bureau Federation. About 650 farmers, ranchers and others involved in agriculture will attend seminars, hear speeches, present awards and discuss issues affecting California agriculture. At the end of the meeting, delegates will adopt policies Farm Bureau will pursue in the coming year.

Farm bill discussions near the finish line
Services for the late President George H.W. Bush will likely delay work by Congress to update federal farm policy. Congress has postponed a number of votes as it pauses to honor the late president. Leaders of House and Senate agriculture committees announced last week they had reached agreement on the new farm bill. The legislation updates policies affecting nutrition, conservation, trade, research and other federal agricultural programs.

Poinsettias remain top plant for holidays
A growing variety of holiday plants greets shoppers at California nurseries, though the traditional red poinsettia remains the No. 1 seller. Poinsettia growers say they’ve been offering more of the plants in nontraditional colors, such as white, pink, orange and variegated hues. Nursery owners say they’ve also seen growing demand for additional holiday plants such as Christmas cacti and other succulents.

UC researchers study how plants sense temperature
By identifying how plants respond to daylight and sense temperature, researchers hope ultimately to learn how to breed crops to handle changes in climate. A team of scientists at the University of California, Riverside, report they have learned more about how plants react to temperature changes. The lead researcher says the team found “the master control for temperature sensing in plants,” and now plans further studies on the topic.


ABOUT CALIFORNIA FARM BUREAU FEDERATION

The California Farm Bureau Federation works to protect family farms and ranches on behalf of nearly 36,000 members statewide and as part of a nationwide network of more than 5.5 million Farm Bureau members.